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The Oscars 2014: The Best Acceptance Speeches

The Oscars 2014: The Best Acceptance Speeches

Jared Leto, Cate Blanchett, Matthew McConaughey and Steve McQueen


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In a night to celebrate their on-screen success, the 86th annual academy award winners deliver promising performances off screen too...

Aside from red carpet glamour, and the celebration of cinematic achievement, the 86th annual academy award winners offered some amazing and moving speeches. Jared Leto, who scooped the first award of the night for 'Best Supporting Actor' in Dallas Buyers Club, thanked his fellow nominees before he celebrated his mother. "In 1971, in Bossier City Louisiana, there was a teenage girl who was pregnant with her second child. She was a high school dropout and a single mom, but somehow she managed to make a better life for herself and her children. She encouraged here kids to be creative and work hard and do something special. That girl was my mother and she's here tonight. I just want to say 'I love you mom, thank you for teaching me to dream." Leto further touched on a sensitive subject when he revealed "This is for the 36 million people who have lost the battle to AIDS. And to those of you who have ever felt injustice because of who you are and who you love, I stand here in front of the world with you and for you."

Cate Blanchett, who won the 'Best Actress' award for her role in Blue Jasmine, looked genuinely shocked when her name was announced. Dressed in a stunning Giorgio Armani gown, Blanchett said she "truly appreciated" Woody Allen for casting her for the role, before toasting her fellow female nominees and highlighting the importance of women in film. "(There are those) who are still foolishly clinging to the idea that female films with women at the center are niche experiences," she revealed adding, "They are not. Audiences want to see them, and in fact, they earn money."

After winning 'Best Actor' for his role in Dallas Buyers Club, Matthew McConaughey thanked his family, friends and fellow nominees as well as his hero. "'My hero is me at 35. You see, every day, and every week, and every month, and every year of my life my hero is always ten years away. I'm never going to be my hero. I'm not going to obtain that and that's fine with me because it keeps me with somebody to keep on chasing."

British director Steve McQueen made Oscars history as the first black director to win the highest honour of 'Best Picture' for 12 Years a Slave. "Everyone deserves not just to survive but to live. This is the most important legacy of Solomon Northup," revealed McQueen, referencing his lead character from the film in his acceptance speech.

 

oscar 14 acceptance speech

oscar 14 acceptance speech

oscar 14 acceptance speech

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