Brooklyn Park in New York City was briefly the sit of an exhibition of a bust of the NSA leaker, Edward Snowden on Monday, before officials were forced to remove it only a few hours later. The statue, which has been described as "museum quality" was devised and created by a small group of artists who have been planning this unveiling for just under a year. Under the cover of darkness in the early hours of Monday morning, they snuck into the park to install the bust on top of a plinth, at a monument site. 

 Snowden

The significance of the venue is one of key importance to the group, who assert that the choice to display the statue at the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument inside the park is also part of the message that they are trying to send. In speaking anonymously to select media outlets the artists revealed their thinking behind this decision: 

"This is a guy who some of the traditional mass media has portrayed as a traitor, or a terrorist, and the very same thing would have been said about these POWs in the Revolutionary War times," they said. "But with 200 years of perspective, we realised they were fighting for something all of us are very grateful for. We hope it will shift people's perceptions, or open their eyes, that there could be a different story than what they'e been told."

Whilst they had harboured some hope that the statue, which did not look entirely out of place, could remain, their hopes were dashed when just before 1pm on the same day, authorities took the bust down, stating only that any unauthorised statues and art works in the park are illegal. 

 Snowden