Anna Wintour sat down with New York Magazine's fashion director Amy Larocca for an in-depth discussion ahead of the annual Met Gala last night, in honour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art museum's biggest exhibition to date: China: Through the Looking Glass.

Wintour, who hosts the extravagantly fashionable event, has her own Anna Wintour Costume Centre within the museum, which houses a spotless archive of creations, that Wintour pours over, demonstrating her unbridled love and appreciation of clothes. 

Speaking about the future of print media Wintour said: "About three or four months ago, Eric Schmidt (the executive chairman of Google) came in and he asked me whether the company still believed in doing Annie Leibovitz-type portfolios, which tend to be lavish, expensive, and in exotic locales. And I said, "Well, I think that it's very important to make the print publications even more luxurious and even more special just to differentiate us from everything else that's out there." She went on to say Vogue frequently invite different industry figures to come and in talk to editors and digital editors to discuss the topic, and offer advice for the changing landscape. 

Wintour's mother was a film critic and she is a strong supporter of performing arts, frequenting Broadway and off Broadway theatre productions. But the Vogue editor-in-chief isn't above a box-set addiction, just like any of us, she shared her television preferences: "Oh, Homeland, Game of Thrones, which has just set the bar so high for everybody. I wonder how much one of those episodes costs! The costumes are so good. But I don't watch Mad Men. I can see that it's wonderful, but it's so depressing. Or House of Cards. Everyone is so evil! There's no one to root for, and you always want to root for somebody."

Having attended a press conference in Beijing with Andrew Bolton, who curated the exhibition, earlier this year, Wintour was thrown a question about feminism which she deflected to Bolton to answer, but during her New York Magazine interview she was asked about balancing family life and a career and gave a befitting answer for the first question: "I think it's very important for children to understand that women work and that it's fulfilling and it doesn't mean that they love you any less or care about you any less."

And when asked whether she will be supporting America's first hope for a female president, Hilary Clinton, she responded with a resounding: "I hope so! Of course. Yes."

Met Wintour